Home / Europe / This Man Has Been Placing Scorpion On His Body To Sting Him For The Past Decade, Says It Wards Off Rheumatism Pain

This Man Has Been Placing Scorpion On His Body To Sting Him For The Past Decade, Says It Wards Off Rheumatism Pain

A 78-year-old Cuban farmer, Pepe Casanas, has been hunting down a scorpion to sting himself with once a month for the past decade, claiming the venom wards off his rheumatism pains.

Casanas seems not to be alone in his belief that the blue scorpion venom wards off rheumatism pains. His natural remedy is no longer seen as very unusual in Cuba where researchers have backed the therapy.

Reuters report’s that researchers in Cuba have found that the venom of the blue scorpion, whose scientific name is Rhopalurus junceus, endemic to the Caribbean island, appears to have anti-inflammatory and pain relief properties, and may be able to delay tumor growth in some cancer patients.

While some oncologists abroad say more research is needed to be able to properly back up such a claim, Cuban pharmaceutical firm Labiofam has been using scorpion venom since 2011 to manufacture the homeopathic medicine Vidatox.
The blue scorpion venom remedy has proven popular.

Labiofam Business Director Carlos Alberto Delgado told Reuters sales were climbing 10 percent annually. Vidatox already sells in around 15 countries worldwide and is currently in talks with China to sell the remedy there.

A worker extracts venom from a scorpion to produce homeopathic medicine Vidatox at LABIOFAM, the Cuban state manufacturer of medicinal and personal hygienic products, in Cienfuegos, Cuba, December 3, 2018. REUTERS/Stringer

In Cuba, where tens of thousands of patients have been treated with Vidatox, each vial costs under a dollar. On the black market abroad it can cost hundred times that – retailers on Amazon.com are seen selling them for up to $140.

“I put the scorpion where I feel pain,” Casanas said while demonstrating his homemade pain relief with a scorpion that he found under a pile of debris on the patch of land he cultivates in Cuba’s western province of Pinar del Rio.
After squeezing it long enough, it stung him and he winced.

“It hurts for a while, but then it calms and goes and I don’t have any more pain,” he said.

Casanas, a leathery-skinned former tobacco farmer who now primarily grows beans for his own consumption, said he sometimes keeps a scorpion under his straw hat like a lucky charm.

It likes the shade and humidity, he says, so just curls up and sleeps.

Reuters

About Saxon

Saxon is a prolific writer with passion for the unusual. I believe the bizarre world is always exciting so keeping you up to date with such stories is my pleasure

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